Listening Notes: What China's commitment to carbon neutrality means for Morrison's gas plans; Freedom Street documentary shows how the externalisation of Australia's migration control policies impacts refugees in Indonesia

Monday, 19 October 2020 - 2:00pm to 2:30pm
Pioneer Of Freedom Street IV housing hundreds of refugees in Makassar City, Indonesia. Photo courtesy of Alfred Pek

Photo: Pioneer Of Freedom Street IV housing hundreds of refugees in Makassar City, Indonesia. Photo courtesy of Alfred Pek

 

What China's commitment to carbon neutrality means for Morrison's gas plans

 

In a statement at the United Nations General Assembly in September China’s leader Xi Jinping committed his country to carbon neutrality by 2060. If China is serious about this pledge, there are huge implications for Australia’s fossil fuel industry and the Federal Government’s plans for a gas-led Covid-19 recovery. Hao Tan is an Associate Professor with the Newcastle Business School, University of Newcastle with research interests in China’s energy and resource transitions. He joined me on Listening Notes to discuss these developments.

Hao Tan and his colleagues have written China just stunned the world with its step-up on climate action – and the implications for Australia may be huge. Link to paper Here

 

Freedom denied: The impact of the externalisation of Australia's migrant control policies on refugees in Indonesia

 

Alfred Pek is a filmmaker, video journalist and refugee advocate based in Sydney, Australia. He’s currently working on Freedom Street, a documentary about three refugees living in Makassar, Indonesia, and the impact of Australia’s external migration control policies on their lives. Fundraising website below:

https://documentaryaustralia.com.au/project/freedom-street/

 

To find out more about how Australia's externalised migration control policies function in Indonesia check out:

Policy Paper: Externalisation of Migration Control Policies: An Introduction by Amy Nethery and Asher Hirsh, Comparative Network on Refugee Externalisation Policies (CONREP) April, 2020 here

 

Quote from the above paper:

Externalisation policies undermine human rights principles, violate international law, cause significant harm for refugees and people seeking asylum, and undermine the entire system of refugee protection.

Such policies must be resisted and challenged to protect the rights of asylum seekers and refugees, including through legal challenges in domestic and international fora, democratic institutions, civil society and grassroots movements.

Nethery and Hirsh 2020, p.14