Will Barnaby Joyce's pro-mining stance see the Nationals lose their base? Environmental markets won't compensate for years of government neglect

Monday, 26 July 2021 - 6:00pm to 6:30pm
Echuca, Victoria    Arun Clarke: Unsplash

Mining or farming: What do the Nationals really stand for?

Barnaby Joyce's return to the leadership and his hard pro-mining stance raise questions about the future of an increasingly divided National Party. Honorary Professor Geoff Cockfield from the Institute for Resilient Regions and the Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Systems at the University of Southern Queensland, explores these issues against the backdrop of current international developments and the downturn in the market for coal, the relationship between Australian farmers and mining companies and the history of the National Party.

https://theconversation.com/are-the-nationals-now-the-party-for-mining-n...

 

Environmental markets can't compensate for decades of government neglect

This year's federal budget included an A$32.1 million scheme to promote a so-called "biosecurity stewardship" scheme. Dr Philippa England from Griffith Law School tells us why the scheme is a lose-lose project, failing the majority of farmers and the environment. Evaluations have shown that such schemes are expensive, time consuming and often unworkable. They don't replace investment in sustained long term government funding for projects that we know are effective in protecting the land and biodiversity.

https://theconversation.com/nature-is-a-public-good-a-plan-to-save-it-us...

 

 

Monday 6:00pm to 6:30pm
This show casts a critical eye on the myriad ways in which we communicate with each other in our increasingly interconnected, multi-media platform world. Each week we mix down the who, the what, the where, and the how of particular communication events, messages, trends and technologies, and then consider: what impacts and what consequences?

Presenter

Reema Rattan, Liam Armstrong, Carly Dober and Judith Peppard

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